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Adaptive reuse

City Living
New restaurant announced for Stanley Marketplace
July 28, 2015 at 12:06 am 0
Rendering of the redeveloped Stanley Marketplace. Courtesy b public relations.

Rendering of the redeveloped Stanley Marketplace. Courtesy b public relations.

Stanley Marketplace, an adaptive reuse development on the border of Denver and Aurora has announced that GoodBird Kitchen has signed to lease space. This restaurant will feature Post Brewing Company beer. GoodBirdKitchen will be a smaller, more streamlined version of The Post Brewing Company in Lafayette. It will offer their fried and rotisserie chicken, local farm fresh sides, and homemade pies. Stanley Aviation utilized the site as its headquarters where aircraft ejector seats were manufactured beginning in 1954. The company was started by Bob Stanley who was the first person to ever fly a jet aircraft when he was working as a test pilot in 1942. The vision for this adaptive reuse project is to convert the former Stanley Aviation property which has been sitting unused for years into a thriving urban marketplace. The Stanley Marketplace project located at 2501 Dallas Street in Aurora continues to make progress and is slated to open this fall. The Stapleton-based firm Flightline Ventures consisting of Stapleton residents Mark Shaker, Lorin Ting and Megan Von Wald partnered with the City of Aurora to bring this project to fruition.  
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Construction Updates
RiNo and Five Points construction update
May 26, 2015 at 12:35 am 3
Mother nature provided just enough of a gap between rain showers to allow me to sneak out to Denver's Five Points and River North (RiNo) neighborhoods to snap some photos of the constructions projects taking shape. 2300 Welton Pictured above is the 2300 Welton project that just began construction. The development will include 223 residential units. This project was designed by Denver-based Humphries Poli Architects. The Wheatley Also under construction in Denver's Five Points is The Wheatley at 25th Street and Welton. This development will include 14 for-sale town homes, 82 apartments and space for ground floor retail. This site was the location of the Phillis Wheatley Young Woman's Christian Association which operated from 1916-1964. Phillis Wheatley was the first published African-American woman and first published African-American poet. Larimer Row Pictured above is the Larimer Row townhome project in Denver's River North (RiNo) neighborhood. This project is taking shape 34th and Larimer. Once fully completed will include 28 townhomes. Factory Flats Factory Flats broke ground this month and is a for-sale condo development. It will include space for ground floor retail. This project is located at 3198 Blake Street. Factory Flats is targeting LEED and ENERGY STAR certifications and each unit will be solar-powered. Backyard on Blake Pictured above is the Backyard on Blake development. This project includes the adaptive reuse of an existing brick structure and new construction to create a development that will feature, office, retail and residential components. Hartley Flats Pictured above is the Hartley Flats project that is nearing completion at 27th and Walnut Street. This project will house one and two bedroom apartment units. 31st and Brighton Boulevard Above is the construction site of a mixed-use development on Brighton Boulevard that stretches between 31st Street and 35 Street. Featured in this development will be condominiums and retail space. Below is the site of the new Great Divide Brewing Co brewery at 35th Street and Brighton Boulevard. Great Divide Brewing Co   The Crossing at Denargo Market Above is The Crossing at Denargo Market apartments located at 2525 Wewatta Way currently under construction at the confluence of Denver's Ballpark and RiNo neighborhoods. This development includes 321 apartment units in a 5 story building, wrapped around a 6 level parking structure. Freight Residences Pictured above construction continues on the Freight Residences located at TAXI. Unlike most of Denver’s current apartment projects under construction, Freight Residences is designed to attract young families. The lobby of the building will serve as a children’s art area. Zeppelin Development is building this 48-unit project.
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Project Announcements
New design for Hilton Garden Inn
May 14, 2015 at 11:49 pm 0
Back in March Denver Urban Review reported on the planned Hilton Garden Inn that is slated to take root in Denver's Union Station neighborhood. Since that report there have been a few different renderings of the project floating around the web. After contacting the development team, it has been confirmed that the below rendering is reflective of what will take shape at 20th Street and Chestnut Place. Denver Urban Review will keep you posted on any future design changes to this Hilton Garden Inn project. For more information on this project check out the article from March.
Rendering of Hilton Garden  Inn that is planned for Denver's Union Station neighborhood. Image courtesy Focus Property Group.

Rendering of Hilton Garden Inn that is planned for Denver's Union Station neighborhood. Image courtesy Focus Property Group.

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Architecture, Project Announcements
Denver architecture firm focuses on low-income projects
April 24, 2015 at 2:19 am 0
Creative high-end design does not usually go hand in hand with low-income housing, but Denver based architecture firm Shopworks has made it their mission to provide great architecture to low-income people. Denver native and North High School graduate Chad Holtzinger founded Shopworks in 2012 after honing his design skills with OZ Architecture for 13 years. he first worked on a low-income residential project for seniors at 38th and Tennyson while working for OZ. "The time came for me to forge a new path in 2012. The main reason why I wanted to design low-income projects was that the people that are typically associated with these types of projects are amazing. Our focus is urban infill projects that have the low-income and community components to them," stated Holtzinger.
Rendering of Terraza del Sol. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Rendering of Terraza del Sol. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Rendering of Terraza del Sol. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Rendering of Terraza del Sol. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Shopworks Architecture is housed in an unassuming building in Denver's LoHi neighborhood. Hotzinger's dad ran a heating and air conditioning business out of the building where the firm is now located. A mixed-use project has been unveiled by Shopworks with its design of Terraza Del Sol, a development that will feature 42 apartment units and 20,00 square feet of office and community space that will become the home of the nonprofit organization- Mi Casa. This project will be constructed at 3116 W. Alameda. The developer is Gorman and Co. with Deneuve Construction as the general contractor. Colorado market president Kimball Crangle of Gorman and Co. states, "Shopworks is an excellent partner on community revitalization infill projects. Their willingness to get to know the specific project site and neighborhood results in a project that fits its surrounding." Currently on the boards is a low-income residential project that is slated to take root at 1029 Santa Fe. "It is 58 apartments in the Santa Fe Arts District, and we’re re-using half of the Amick warehouse building with its funky art deco façade, and inserting a new structure between it and the new ballet building to the north.  We hope to break ground on this early next year," revealed Holtzinger.
Rending of 1029 Santa Fe. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Rending of 1029 Santa Fe. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Plans for another project designed by Shopworks is planned to take shape in Arizona once financing is secured. Holtzinger states, "the Encore project is a proposed affordable senior housing project north of downtown Phoenix, near the Roosevelt art district.  The program is 44 apartments, some live/work units at the first floor, and a small art gallery.  The site is adjacent to a historic farm house that may be redeveloped into a brewery.  This project is on hold pending funding through the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program."
Planned Encore project. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

Planned Encore project in Phoenix. Image courtesy Shopworks Architecture.

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Architecture
Meet Stephen Dynia, the architect behind TAXI and The Source
April 20, 2015 at 2:31 am 0
"Denver is a place of great opportunity. It is where the whole continent shifts from being flat to being vertical; those edges are beautiful things. Denver hugs this line, a transition of topography," -Architect Stephen Dynia
It doesn't take long to discern that architect Stephen Dynia, the man behind the design of TAXI and The Source, is a native of the northeast with his New York accent. However, he is as affable as he is outgoing, and he feels that Denver is a city of optimism.  Dynia founded his eponymous firm in 1993 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Before that, he began his career working for the well known architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill after receiving his architecture degree from the Rhode Island School of Design.
Drive 2 at TAXI designed by Dynia Architects.

Drive 2 at TAXI designed by Dynia Architects.

"I worked for Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in New York City out of college and even though it was in the 80's it felt like the show Mad Men and we all knew where the keys to the partners' liquor cabinet was. After 6 years it became no longer fun to be in a corporate setting," explained Dynia. After the New York City chapter came to an end Dynia was unsure of what his next move should be. "After the corporate stuff I really did not know what to do next. I missed the craft of architecture and I visited a friend I knew in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and realized that no one was doing modern houses here. I then slowly built up a reputation of introducing glass and steel to a mountain environment," stated Dynia. Dynia  spent over a decade in Wyoming designing contemporary houses incorporating elements such as movable glass walls to open structures up to the environment, and even designed a 500-seat performing arts venue in Jackson Hole. As time moved forward he began to take an interest in Denver. He viewed it as a hub for travel and then started to become engaged in what was taking place and purchased a place to crash in the Mile High City. "Denver is a place of great opportunity. It is where the whole continent shifts from being flat to being vertical; those edges are beautiful things. Denver hugs this line, a transition of topography," describes Dynia. "I think Denver in general is a very optimistic city. It has access to recreation and it is still urban enough and gritty enough to it to make it interesting. It has ethnic diversity and things like railroad tracks which are a fascination with an eternal movement that is like an ocean here."
Stephen Dynia

Architect Stephen Dynia

In Denver Dynia teamed up with Zeppelin Development and his first project in Denver was Freight, a 28,000 square foot building that was originally designed for shipping and storage. Dynia accepted the challenge of redesigning the building to an office space that features abundant community space for collaboration. This project is located in TAXI a campus of new and converted structures in Denver's River North neighborhood (RiNo) near 31st and Brighton Boulevard. "You are pretty free to do a lot of experimentation in RiNo and there is a gritty honesty to the whole environment that makes you not want to do BS and it mixes new with old," opined Dynia. "We are free to design buildings that are reflective of their time and I hate the insincerity of trying to make something new look old and to me that is the worst insult to historicism."
Rendering of Freight Residences. Image courtesy  Zeppelin Development

Rendering of Freight Residences. Image courtesy Zeppelin Development

Unlike most of Denver’s current apartment projects under construction, Freight Residences (rendering shown above) which is being built at the TAXI campus is designed to attract young families. The lobby of the building will serve as a children’s art area. Freight Residences will have a lawn adjacent to the building where children will be able to play within view of their parent’s residence. Native plants have been incorporated into the landscaping and will be irrigated with reclaimed storm water. Dynia's firm has worked on every development in TAXI. Dynia mentioned that projects need to create space that can be used for educational and artistic purposes and not just for retail spaces. "Apartments can be designed to accommodate all sorts of people- young couples, families and retirees. Right now there is this engine that is creating these cookie cutter projects because it is the safe thing to do. It really depresses me to see the stuff that is built here now in Denver. It is a lapse of creativity born out of an economic condition," stated Dynia. RiNo's adaptive reuse project The Source, an 1880s brick foundry that was converted to a public market for artisan vendors. The Source is located in RiNo and was also designed by Dynia.
The Source. Photo Credit Tim Hursly.

The Source. Photo Credit Tim Hursly.

A 10-story hotel is currently being designed by Dynia and is slated to be located adjacent to The Source. When asked if Denver Urban Review could take a look at the renderings of this hotel project, Dynia looked up and grinned and without having to say any words, I knew that was an indication that the renderings were not quite ready to be showcased. For more information on Dynia Architects and to view their projects visit their website.
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